Autumn Vocabulary

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As Autumn is now upon us, and it being Wednesday, we are going to learn some new vocabulary about this lovely season. Before we start though, Autumn is named differently in North America. Do you know what it is? It is called ‘Fall’ but this word originally came from an Old English word to describe the ‘fall of the leaf’ during this season with ‘Autumn’ being referred to as ‘Harvest’ (related to the important period of farming).

1. A chestnut

Aesculus_hippocastanum_fruit

2. A pumpkin

pumpkin on white background with piece cut

3. Wellington Boots/Wellingtons/Wellies

Wellies

4. Harvesting

Agriculture_in_Volgograd_Oblast_002

5. Scarecrows

DCF 1.0

 

Idioms Related to Autumn

With some of the words related to Autumn above, there is obviously some more natural language related to this season as well. Let’s have a look at some of these idioms and phrases.

 

1. That old chestnut!

This phrase means a story or joke that is uninteresting as you have heard it from the same person so many times.

David: “The best years of your life are when you’re a child”.

Susan: “Not that old chestnut again!”

 

 

2. Turn over a new leaf

This is a useful phrase which you could use when you want to change something or would like to begin something again.

Steven: “I am going to quit smoking.”

Philip: “That’s a great idea! It’s always best to turn over a new leaf.”

 

 

3. To go/be nuts about something or someone

If you feel obsessed or really interesting in something then you could use this phrase to express this.

Stacy: “Did you see the new iPhone? It looks amazing!”

David: “Yeah! I’m nuts about it. I’m gonna buy it as soon as I can.”

 

 

4. To squirrel something away

 

If you are saving or putting money away for something in the future, then you could use the phrase “to squirrel something away”.

Jack: “Do you want to go out this evening?”

Tess: “Sorry, I’m squirrelling money away for a new car and can’t afford to go out tonight.”

 

 

5. Autumn years

 

This is a lovely phrase which you could use when describing somebody in their later years in life.

Jason: “In Pete’s Autumn years, he was able to enjoy more time in his garden.”

Derek: “He was always a keen gardener.”

 

That is all for now people. If you like this post, please share with your friends. Be sure to check out the blog every week for new updates.

Posted in The LTC Blog, English Vocabulary |